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April 27, 2005: Jungfernflug. Yeah!

Researchers: Early universe liquid-like
By Bryn Nelson, NewsDay.com, April 19, 2005.

Study describes how HIV beats body's defenses Virus moves in as T-cells drop protein shields
By Sabin Russell, San Francisco Chronicle, April 14, 2005.

Our Incredible Shrinking Curiosity
By Rick Weiss, The Washinton Post, April 10, 2005.

A quick evolution of ruffled feathers
By Bryn Nelson, NewsDay.com, April 6, 2005.

Technique to Fix DNA Flaws Is Tested
By Rick Weiss, Washinton Post, April 4, 2005.

Senate OK's research on stem cells
By Scott S. Greenberger, Boston Globe, March 31, 2005.

Huge Genome Project Is Proposed to Fight Cancer
By Andrew Pollack, The New York Times, March 28, 2005.



Astronomers see glow from faraway planets
By David Perlman, The San Francisco Chronicle, March 23, 2005.

GM study shows potential 'harm'
By N. N., BBC News, March 21, 2005.

Rubella Virus Eliminated in the United States
By David Brown, The Washington Post, March 21, 2005.

Women Are Very Much Not Alike, Gene Study Finds
By Robert Lee Hotz, The Los Angeles Times, March 17, 2005.

Global warming has momentum, 2 studies show
By Katy Human, DenverPost.com, March 17, 2005.

UCLA plans $20 million institute to conduct stem cell research
By N.N., The San Francisco Chronicle, March 16, 2005.

Battle on Teaching Evolution Sharpens
By Peter Slevin, The Washington Post, March 14, 2005.

'Theory of everything' tying researchers up in knots
By Keay Davidson, The San Francisco Chronicle, March 14, 2005.

'I Have a Nightmare'
By Nicholas Kristof, The New York Times, March 12, 2005.

US, German scientists sequence oldest fossil human protein ever
By N.N., China View, March 9, 2005.

Drug-Coated Stent Devices Making Strides in Heart Care
By Marilynn Marchione, The Washington Post, March 7, 2005.



NCI Creates Gene Expression Database of Normal Human Organ Tissue
March 3, 2005.

Seeing 11 billion years old IR light! NASA Telescope Spots Faraway Galaxies By N.N., NewsDay.com, March 2, 2005.

Caring for Creation
By Jan Weaver, MU Environmental Network News, March 2005.

Astronomers find star-less galaxy
By N.N., BBC News, February 23, 2005.

Tiny Is Beautiful: Translating 'Nano' Into Practical
By Kenneth Chang, New York Times, February 22, 2005.

Mars pictures reveal frozen sea
By N.N., BBC News, February 21, 2005.

Human fossils dated to 195,000 years
By Bryn Nelson, NewsDay.com, February 16, 2005.

Fat Substitute, Once Praised, Is Pushed Out of the Kitchen
By Kim Severson and Melanie Warner, The New York Times, February 13, 2005.

2004 Was Fourth-Warmest Year Ever Recorded
By Andrew Revkin, The New York Times, February 10, 2005.



Focus Narrows in Search for Autism's Cause
By Sandra Blakeslee, The New York Times, February 8, 2005.

Ernst Mayr, Pioneer in Tracing Geography's Role in the Origin of Species, Dies at 100
By Carol Kaesuk Yoon, The New York Times, February 5, 2005.

Public to get online access to studies
By Jamie Talan, Newsday.com, February 4, 2005.

Scientists Find Missing Matter
By Amit Asaravala, Wired News, February 3, 2005.



Evolution Takes a Back Seat in U.S. Classes
By Cornelia Dean, The New York Times, February 1, 2005.

Deciding How Much Global Warming Is Too Much
By Andrew Revkin, The New York Times, February 1, 2005.

Nanomedicine's Promise Is Anything but Tiny
By Rick Weiss, Washington Post, January 31, 2005. C&EN NanoFocus.

Terrorist explosive blows up without flames
By Jenny Hogan, NewScientist.com, January 31, 2005.

Scientists Scan Data From Saturn's Moon
By Melissa Eddy, Newsday.com, January 27, 2005.

Banned Report on Vioxx Published
By Thomas Maugh, Los Angeles Times, January 25, 2005.

University cheers chemistry boost
By N.N., BBC News UK Edition, January 25, 2005.

Shock and Awe
By Charles Krauthammer, Time, January 24, 2005.

I did not know that!
Johnny Carson Dies at 79
By Associated Press, The New York Times, January 23, 2005.

Methane Rain and River Beds Found on Saturn Moon
By Associated Press, New York Times, January 21, 2005.

Summers before the Fall! (not a typo)
Harvard row over sex and science
By N.N., BBC News, January 18, 2005.

Titan Images Seem To Hold Water
By Guy Gugliotta, The Washington Post, January 16, 2005.

Huygens Images Titan's Surface
By ESA and NASA, Astronomy Picture of the Day, January 15, 2005.

Titan: The Orange World

A Gift for Drug Makers
By Bob Herbert, The New York Times, January 14, 2005.

A DNA Success Raises Bioterror Concern
By Nicholas Wade, The New York Times, January 12, 2005.

We are back for 2005!

Cloned Cat Sale Generates Ethics Debate
By Paul Elias, Newsday.com, December 23, 2004.

Groups gear for fray on stem cell work
By Rachel Melcer, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, December 22, 2004.

Again!?
A Fourth Painkiller Is Linked to Increases in Heart Problems
By Alex Berenson, The New York Times, December 21, 2004.

Many Counties Failing Fine-Particle Air Rules
By Michael Janofsky, The New York Times, December 18, 2004.
For details, see: EPA Announces Final Designations for First Fine Particle Standard

Wo die Zivilcourage keine Heimat hat, reicht die Freiheit nicht weit. Willy Brandt

Yushchenko Poisened by TCDD
By Emma Ross, Associated Press, December 17, 2004.

Tests Reveal Yushchenko's Dioxin Level
By Emma Ross, Newsday.com, December 15, 2004.

Scientists debate decline of oil stores: Sooner or later?
By Keay Davidson, San Francisco Chronicle, December 15, 2004.

The Crux: To Worry or Not to Worry
By Charles McGrath, The New York Times, December 14, 2004.

New Antibiotic Fights Tuberculosis
By Maggie Fox, The Washington Post, December 10, 2004.

Fly Me to the Moon
By Thomas Friedman, The New York Times, December 5, 2004.

Lower Tolerance for Exposure to Benzene
By Andrew Revkin, The New York Times, December 4, 2004.

Worried Colleges Step Up Efforts Over Suicide
By Karen Arenson, The New York Times, December 3, 2004.

The 9/11 Bubble
By Thomas Friedman, The New York Times, December 2, 2004.

Merck to Offer Big Bonuses to Executives if It Is Taken Over
By Alex Berenson, The New York Times, November 29, 2004.

The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts. Bertrand Russell

Hydrogen Production Method Could Bolster Fuel Supplies
By Matthew L. Wald, The New York Times, November 28, 2004.

Lack of Money Slows Cleanup Of Hundreds of Superfund Sites (Direct Link)
By Juliet Eilperin, The Washington Post, November 25, 2004.



The Engine Looks Familiar, but It Runs on Hydrogen
By Don Sherman, The New York Times, November 23, 2004.

Methane in Martian Air Suggests Life Beneath the Surface
By Kenneth Chang, The New York Times, November 22, 2004.

Drunken rats offer insight
By Catherine Clabby, newsobserver.com, November 22, 2004.

States' Tactics Aim to Reduce Drug Spending
By Robert Pear and James Dao, The New York Times, November 21, 2004.
KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION: Prescription Drug Trends, October 2004.

In his remarks, Frist said he and Daschle were often in a "competitive environment" but "Senator Daschle has always, always, without exception, handled each and every situation in that competition with class and with honesty and with integrity and with forthrightness and with true grace." In Farewell, Daschle Puts Emphasis on Cooperation, By Helen Dewar, Washington Post, Saturday, November 20, 2004.

Evidence Hints at Earlier Humans in Americas
By John Noble Wilford, The New York Times, November 18, 2004.

Google Scholar Goes Online Thursday November 18, 2004.

Google Plans New Service for Scientists and Scholars
By John Markoff, The New York Times, November 18, 2004.

Study ties ozone levels to mortality
By N.N., The Los Angeles Times, November 17, 2004.

Test your knowledge about the clean, green energy sources of the future with the BBC News quiz.
BBC, November 15, 2004.

Slow but Cheaply, a New Way to the Moon
By Guy Gugliotta, The Washington Post, November 15, 2004.
SMART-1, powered by one stationary plasma thruster (PPS-1350) with Xenon propellant

Editorial: The Hazards of Vitamin E
By N.N., The New York Times, November 14, 2004.

Pa. school district mandates ``intelligent design'' and alternative theories to evolution in biology curriculum (Dover Area School District)
By Martha Raffaele, The San Francisco Chronicle, November 12, 2004.

Mutant fish found in Colorado rivers
By Cliff Thompson, Vail Daily, November 11, 2004.

Sleep Inspires Creative Thinking
By Anahad O'Connor, The New York Times, November 11, 2004.

Vitamin E May Be Harmful
By Reuters, The New York Times, November 10, 2004.

With "Scramjet", NASA shoots for Mach 10
By Guy Gugliotta, The Washington Post, November 10, 2004.

Drinking Deaths Draw Attention to Old Campus Problem
By Mindy Sink, The New York Times, November 9, 2004.

Northern Lights What causes the colors?

Voting without the Facts
By Bob Herbert, The New York Times, November 8, 2004.

Scientists Find Arctic Warming Quickly
By John Heilprin (AP), Baltimoresun.com, November 8, 2004.

Great things happen that were never contained in a plan, and great plans more easily fail than succeed. ... It is not just politics, money or power that changes the future ... it is also the recognition of innovative ideas and people willing to champion their success. John Gardner

Lawyers Organizing for Mass Suits Over Vioxx
By Barnaby J. Feder, The New York Times, November 5, 2004.

Single molecule may lead to nicotine addiction
By Diedtra Henderson, Chicago Sun-Times, November 5, 2004.

Planets in dazzling array
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun, November 5, 2004.

Elizabeth Edwards Diagnosed With Breast Cancer
By Ron Fournier and Randolph Schmid, The Washington Post, November 4, 2004.

Sperm Stem Cells Are Grown Outside Body
By Nicolas Wade, The New York Times, November 4, 2004.



PROPOSITION 71 - A NEW ERA FOR STEM-CELL STUDY
By Carl T. Hall, The San Francisco Chronicle, November 4, 2004.

Climate Gas Cuts 'Are Affordable'
By Alex Kirby, BBC News, November 3, 2004.

F.D.A. Releases Memo on Vioxx
By N.N., Bloomberg News, November 3, 2004.

Student Pugwash USA: ELECTION GUIDE 2004
Under democracy, one party always devotes its chief energies to trying to prove that the other party is unfit to rule -and both commonly succeed, and are right. Anonymous
Facts matter! Check partisan claims at FactCheck.org

Support sought for CO2 storage
By N.N., BBC News, November 1, 2004.

Approved Stem Cells' Potential Questioned
By Rick Weiss, The Washington Post, October 29, 2004.

Scientists Find Skeletons of Miniature People (direct link)
By Nicholas Wade, The New York Times, October 27, 2004.

Articles Highlight Different Views on Genetic Basis of Race (direct link)
By Nicholas Wade, The New York Times, October 27, 2004.

A Real Education, by Way of Sleight of Hand
By Marek Fuchs, The New York Times, October 27, 2004.

Putting a Cool Spin on Einstein's Theories
By Rebecca Dana, The Washington Post, October 26, 2004.

Power-kicks from a crustacean land Cal scientist in the spotlight
By C. W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle, October 22, 2004.

Stocks Fall Sharply as Oil Tops $55 Per Barrel
By The Associated Press, The New York Times, October 22, 2004.
Get some background info at OIL PRICES.

Einstein's warp effect measured
By N.N., BBC News, October 21, 2004.

Humans May Have Fewer Genes Than Thought (direct link)
By Nicholas Wade, The New York Times, October 20, 2004.

Justice consists of doing no one injury, decency in giving no one offense. Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BC)

Public University Tuition Rises Sharply Again for '04 (direct link)
By Greg Winter, The New York Times, October 20, 2004.

How Science Became a Partisan Issue (direct link)
By Andrew Revkin, The New York Times, October 19, 2004.

Fiscal Ruin on the Horizon (direct link)
By David Broder, The Washington Post, October 17, 2004.

For Merck, a Painful Withdrawal
By Brooke A. Masters and Marc Kaufman, The Washington Post, October 17, 2004.

New strategy to block HIV infection shows promise (about microbicide Nonakine)
By Sabin Russell, San Francisco Chronicle, October 15, 2004.

Carbon 'reaching danger levels'
By Alex Kirby, BBC News, October 13, 2004.
The German press notes that 2002 and 2003 might be outliers because of excessive forest fires in those years.

Gene switch can 'turn off cancer'
By N.N., BBC News, October 10, 2004.

Jacques Derrida, Abstruse Theorist, Dies at 74
By Jon Kandell, The New York Times, October 10, 2004.
Derrida has done more damage to young people entering the sciences in the late 20th century than any other single person.

Nobel Prize In Chemistry: Proteins Labelled For Destruction
The Nobel Foundation, October 6, 2004.

I don't get no respect. Rodney Dangerfield.

FDA Accused of Silencing Vioxx Warnings
By Diedtra Henderson, Newsdat.com, October 8, 2004.

Dude, Where's Your Newspaper?
By David T. Mindich, The Chronicle of Higher Education, October 8, 2004.

Critical Gene a Suspect in Lethal Epidemic
By Nicholas Wade, The New York Times, October 7, 2004.

I find that the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have. Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)

The Ig Nobel Prizes
By Dabiel Engber, The Chronicle of Higher Education, October 1, 2004.

Samoa-Cal: share profits if cloned gene works in AIDS fight
By Kelly St. John, The San Francisco Chronicle, October 1, 2004.

With Russia's Nod, Treaty on Emissions Clears Last Hurdle
By Seth Mydans and Andrew C. Revkin, The New York Times, October 1, 2004.

Merck Pulls Vioxx Painkiller From Market, and Stock Plunges
By Terence Neilan, The New York Times, September 30, 2004.

Space Sugar a Clue to Life's Origins
By Guy Gugliotta, The Washington Post, September 29, 2004. (ApJL article)

Pilot Says Private Rocket "Flew Like a Dream"
By John Schwartz, The New York Times, September 29, 2004.
Scaled Composites. Congratulations to this one VISIONARY entrepreneur!!

Saudis to Boost Oil Production Capacity as Price Hits $50
By Jay Mouawad, The New York Times, September 28, 2004.

Free to Clone
By Brian Alexander, The New York Times, September 26, 2004. A must-read. Fundamental!

If the questions you ask and the science you do really challenges or explores cultural or religious or political norms ... that in itself is an act of rebellion, and this is exactly the sort of thing that fits comfortably in the spirit of the First Amendment. R. Alta Charo

MIT researchers powering electronics with photosynthesis
By Mark Pratt, SFGate.com, September 24, 2004.

Getting Out the Vote: One Professor Insists Upon It
By Marek Fuchs, The New York Times, September 22, 2004.

Fraud trial over tobacco starts (direct link)
By N.N., USA Today, September 21, 2004.

Looking to the hydrogen horizon
By Paul Mason, BBC News, September 21, 2004.

Only in Quantum Physics: Spinning While Standing Still
By Kenneth Chang, The New York Times, September 21, 2004.

Silicon Completes Triple Crown (local pdf file)
By N.N., Chemical and Engineering News, September 20, 2004.

Californians to Vote on Spending $3 Billion on Stem Cell Research
By John Broder and Andrew Pollack, The New York Times, September 20, 2004.

Seeking a Slim Victory, Drugmakers Press FDA
By Rob Stein, The Washington Post, September 17, 2004.

Fuel suspected deep inside Earth Studies suggest heat under crust may not destroy methane gas
By Keay Davidson, San Francisco Chronicle, September 15, 2004.

Force of Nature
By J. Madeleine Nash, Time, September 13, 2004.

The Dark Side of Small
By Richard Monastersky, The Chronicle of Higher Education, September 10, 2004.

Team Hopeful in Its Effort to Recreate Primal Life (direct link)
By Nicholas Wade, The New York Times, September 9, 2004.

Eskimos Fret as Climate Shifts and Wildlife Changes (direct link)
By Clifford Krauss, The New York Times, September 6, 2004.

Suffering Effects of 50's A-Bomb Test (direct link)
By Sarah Kershaw, The New York Times, September 5, 2004.

I.B.M. Offers $10,000 to Owners of Contaminated Houses
By Anthony DePalma, The New York Times, September 3, 2004. (Read about the background here)

To know what is right and not to do it is the worst cowardice. Confucius

Need for carbon sink technologies
By Carolyn Fry, BBC News, September 1, 2004.

Acid oceans spell doom for coral
By Carolyn Fry, BBC News, September 1, 2004.

3 Planets Are Found Close in Size to Earth, Making Scientists Think 'Life'
By Dennis Overbye, The New York Times, September 1, 2004.

First practical plastic magnet created
By Matthew Killeya, NewScientist.com, August 30, 2004.

Figuring out the very nature of nature UC lab heads groundbreaking genome work
By David Perlman, San Francisco Chronicle, August 30, 2004.

Die Rache der Journalisten an den Politikern ist das Archiv. Robert Hochner

Doctors Grow New Jaw Bone in Man's Back
By Emma Ross, Newsday.com, August 29, 2004.

M.I.T. Makes Yale Provost First Woman to Be Its Chief
By Katie Zezima, The New York Times, August 27, 2004.

Gates, others lead California effort for stem cell research
By Paul Elias, The New York Times, August 27, 2004.

White House Shifts Its Focus on Climate
By Andrew Revkin, The New York Times, August 26, 2004.

Group of Trees in Wis. Forced Into the Future (direct link)
By Kari Lydersen, The Washington Post, August 23, 2004.

Fear follows plan to build more deadly-disease labs
By Anna Badkhen, San Francisco Chronicle, August 22, 2004.

Sir Godfrey Hounsfield, Who Helped Develop the CAT Scanner, Dies at 84
By Jeremy Pearce, The New York Times, August 20, 2004.

RUOK? A Tutorial for Parents
By David Pogue, The New York Times, August 19, 2004.

CALIFORNIA Global warming clouds the future (PNAS article)
By Carl Hall, SFGate.com, August 18, 2004.

'Data Quality' Law Is Nemesis Of Regulation (direct link)
By Rick Weiss, The Washington Post, August 16, 2004.

Guidelines On Use of Powerful Painkillers
By Marc Kaufman, The Washington Post, August 15, 2004.

Boiling Point: Who's to Blame for Global Warming?
By Al Gore, The New York Times, August 15, 2004.

Injections Temporarily Turn Slacker Monkeys Into Model Workers
By Alan Zarembo, The Los Angeles Times, August 12, 2004.

God created time, the devil created calendars. Erwin Chargaff
His other rules are pretty insightful too.


Dig reaches back 16,000 years
By Frank Roylance, The Baltimore Sun, August 9, 2004.

U.S. archives tries to save data
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun, August 4, 2004.

Crick, Who Discovered DNA Structure With Watson, Dies
By Nicholas Wade, The New York Times, July 29, 2004.

Researchers Create an Artificial Prion (Science Article)
By Sandra Blakeslee, The New York Times, July 29, 2004.

The promise and perils of the nanotech revolution
By Keay Davidson, The San Francisco Chronicle, July 26, 2004.

The Roach That Failed
By Sam Schechner, The New York Times, July 25, 2004.

The Lance Armstrong Foundation
Lance Armstrong, Winner of his SIXTH consecutive Tour de France, July 25, 2004.
It's a full-year commitment. That's the secret. The answer is total, full commitment and hard work.

Owning Up to Abortion
By Barbara Ehrenreich, The New York Times, July 22, 2004.

Ideas on WHO Delegates at Odds (direct link)
By David Brown, The Washington Post, July 22, 2004.

About Those Fearsome Black Holes? Never Mind
By Dennis Overbye, The New York Times, July 22, 2004.

Hawking Says He Was Wrong About Black Holes
By AP, The New York Times, July 21, 2004.

8 States Sue 5 Biggest Emitters of Carbon Dioxide
By Andrew C. Revkin, The New York Times, July 21, 2004.

This Is Your Brain on Meth: A "Forest Fire" of Damage
By Sandra Blakeslee, The New York Times, July 20, 2004.

It makes a big difference whether I know something, or whether I love it, or whether I understand it, or whether I strive for it. Francesco Petrarca

Radiobiology heats up (direct link)
By Zerah Lurie, Newsday.com, July 19, 2004.

US leading world science
By Stephen Pincock, The Scientist, July 15, 2004.

Calming Parents' Fears About Environmental Hazards
The Real Risks to Children
By Jane Brody, The New York Times, July 13, 2004.

Nano-team spins tomorrow's yarn
By Jo Twist, BBC News, July 8, 2004.

Scientist Takes on National Security Dogma
By William J. Broad, The New York Times, June 29, 2004.

Hardy wild bacteria attract firms' interest
By Paul Elias, Seattle Times, June 27, 2004.

A Very Muscular Baby Offers Hope Against Diseases
By Gina Kolata, The New York Times, June 24, 2004.

Mixing Morals With Education?
By Peter Steinfels, The New York Times, June 19, 2004.

A New Ice Age? None Soon
By Andrew Revkin, The New York Times, June 10, 2004.

Nanotech Memory Chips Might Soon Be a Reality
By Barnaby Feder, The New York Times, June 7, 2004.

Drugs May Turn Cancer Into Manageable Disease
By Andrew Pollack, The New York Times, June 6, 2004.

It Was Medical Gospel, but It Wasn't True
By Gina Kolata, The New York Times, May 30, 2004.

A Different Era for the Alternative Energy Business
By Barnaby Feder, The New York Times, May 29, 2004.

The New Youngest Planet (Water, alcohol, and ice cubes! Life on the rocks?)
By Warren E. Leary, The New York Times, May 28, 2004.

Good Teachers + Small Classes = Quality Education (Naaah!)
By Michael Winerip, The New York Times, May 26, 2004.

Aspirin Is Seen as Preventing Breast Tumors
By Denise Grady, The New York Times, May 26, 2004.

Venus clouds 'might harbour life'
By Martin Refern, BBC News, May 26, 2004.

Malformed Proteins Found in Sheep Muscle
By Donald G. McNeil, Jr., The New York Times, May 24, 2004.

New Evidence of Rapidly Expanding Universe
By Dennis Overbye, The New York Times, May 19, 2004.

Pollution Alters DNA in Mice, Study Finds
By Associated Press, The New York Times, May 18, 2004.

In Praise of Passionate, Opinionated Teaching
By Mark Oppenheimer, The Chronicle Review, May 21, 2004. Volume 50, Issue 37, Page B7.

Pfizer to Pay $420 Million in Illegal Marketing Case (Bastards!! Stealing from the mentally ill!)
By Gardiner Harris, The New York Times, May 14, 2004.

Mice DNA harmed by soot
By N.N., Associated Press, May 14, 2004.

Globe Grows Darker as Sunshine Diminishes 10% to 30% (You must be kidding!?)
By Kenneth Chang, The New York Times, May 13, 2004.

Dense Matter Indeed
By Paul Pringle, The Los Angeles Times, May 13, 2004.

The Disability Movement Turns to Brains
By Amy Harmon, The New York Times, May 9, 2004.

Halls of Ivy May Receive Miracle-Gro in Germany
By Richard Bernstein, The New York Times, May 9, 2004.

Panel Wants Top Health Officials Off Drug Payrolls
By David Willman, Los Angeles Times, May 7, 2004.

National Science Panel Warns of Far Too Few New Scientists
By William Broad, The New York Times, May 5, 2004. S&E Indicators 2004

Giant Squid, Tall Tales and Truth
By Henry Fountain, The New York Times, May 4, 2004. Marine Biology Article

U.S. Is Losing Its Dominance in the Sciences
By William Broad, The New York Times, May 3, 2004.

Darwin-Free Fun for Creationists (a.k.a. Safe Cigarettes! Did you get CIITN #17?)
By Abby Goodnough, The New York Times, May 1, 2004.

In Class, the Audience Weighs In
By Katie Hafner, The New York Times, April 29, 2004.

First-ever gene therapy for treating Alzheimer's
By Carl Hall, San Francisco Chronicle, April 28, 2004.

Committee Urges Harvard to Expand the Reach of Its Undergraduate Curriculum
By Sara Rimer, The New York Times, April 27, 2004.

A Galactic Warrior, With Hypothetical Enemies
By Clive Thompson, The New York Times, April 24, 2004.

Scientific Teaching
By Jo Handelsman, et al., Science, April 23, 2004.

Plan Near for Global Climate Monitoring
By Kenji Hall, Newsday.com, April 23, 2004.

Lemelson-MIT Recognizes Inventor of LED
By Theo Emery, Associated Press, April 21, 2004.

DAVIS/Governor promises push for hydrogen fuel
By Mark Martin, San Francisco Chronicle, April 21, 2004.

Amid Doubters, Making a Case for Lively Venus
By Guy Gugliotta, The Washington Post, April 20, 2004.

Using M.R.I.'s to See Politics on the Brain
By John Tierney, The New York Times, April 20, 2004.

The asthma riddle (Riddle? It's the air, Stupid!)
By Stephen Smith, The New York Times, April 13, 2004. See also Ozone-Asthma Link.

What the World Needs Now Is DDT
By Tina Rosenberg, The New York Times, April 11, 2004.

Princeton Proposes Curbing the Growing Number of A's Awarded to A-List Students
By Karen W. Arenson, The New York Times, April 8, 2004.

The Altered Human Is Already Here
By James Gorman, The New York Times, April 6, 2004.

New Lesson for College Students: Lighten Up
By Sara Rimer, The New York Times, April 6, 2004.

Stanford ready to give Einstein big exam
By David Perlman, San Francisco Chronicle, April 5, 2004.

Inflammatory Debate
By Delthia Ricks, Newsday, April 5, 2004.

Changing All the Rules
By Bruce Barcott, The New York Times, April 4, 2004.

How are we doing? GDP, GPI, HDI and ISEW
By Jan Weaver, MU Environmental Network News, April 2004.

Top 100 April Fool's Day Hoaxes of All Time
April 1, 2004. (Check out #24 on Drunk Driving on the Internet.)

Lack of research stymies efforts to standardize herbal supplement industry
By Andrew Bridges, SFGate, March 31, 2004.

Scientists Win Prize for High-Yield Rice
By N.N., Associated Press, March 29, 2004.

Health Concerns about Nanotechnology
By Barnaby J. Feder, The New York Times, March 29, 2004.

Pollution and the Slippery Meaning of ’Clean’ (a must read)
By Anthony Depalma, The New York Times, March 28, 2004.

U.S. Will Give Cold Fusion Second Look, After 15 Years
By Kenneth Chang, The New York Times, March 25, 2004.

University Plans Human Stem Cell Trials
By Associated Press, March 23, 2004.

Sir John A. Pople, 78, Who Won Nobel Chemistry Prize, Dies
By Kenneth Chang, The New York Times, March 18, 2004.

MIT reviews what, how it teaches
By Marcella Bombardieri, The Boston Globe, March 17, 2004.

SoCal city falls victim to Internet hoax, considers banning items made with water
by N.N., Associated Press, March 15, 2004

Bashful vs. Brash in the New Field of Nanotech
by Barnaby Feder, The New York Times, March 15, 2004

Origin of Species (a must-read!)
by Thomas Friedman, The New York Times, March 14, 2004

'The Great Influenza' and 'Microbial Threats to Health': Virus Alert
by Barry Gewen, The New York Times, March 14, 2004

G.E. Signals a Growing Interest in Solar
by Barnaby J. Feder, The New York Times, March 13, 2004

Groundbreaking Gene Scientist Is Taking His Craft to the Oceans
by Andrew Pollack, The New York Times, March 5, 2004

U.S. Requests Exemptions to Ozone Pact for Chemical
by Andrew Revkin, The New York Times, March 4, 2004

Science and Environmental Policy
by Jan Weaver, MU Environmental Network News, March 2004, Vol. 10 No. 3

Chemicals kill 90bn French bees
by Alex Kirby, BBC News Online, March 3, 2004.

Harvard Plans Center to Grow Stem Cells
by Associate Press, The New York Times, March 1, 2004

When new science ignites a firestorm
Ewing Duncan, San Francisco Examiner, Feb. 23, 2004

Crossing Ethical Borders: Human Cloning Marches On, Without U.S. Help
Nicholas Wade, The New York Times, Feb. 15, 2004

Watching the Jobs Go By
Nicholas D. Kristof, The New York Times, Feb. 11, 2004

New H.I.V. Test Identifies Cases in College Students
by Lawrence Altman, The New York Times, Feb. 11, 2004

Caution call on 'maverick' claims
BBC News, Feb. 10, 2004

Missouri Standard Science Act
HOUSE BILL NO. 911, 92ND GENERAL ASSEMBLY, INTRODUCED BY REPRESENTATIVES COOPER (155) (Sponsor), REINHART, DAVIS (19), NIEVES, PHILLIPS, EMERY AND HUNTER (Co-sponsors). Pre-filed December 19, 2003, and copies ordered printed.

Report Questions Bush Plan for Hydrogen-Fueled Cars
The New York Times, Feb. 6, 2004, By MATTHEW L. WALD

Ban Urged on All Animal Protein for Cattle
The New York Times, Feb. 5, 2004, By D. G. McNEIL and D. GRADY

Stronger Warning Urged on Antidepressants for Teenagers
The New York Times, Feb. 3, 2004, By ERICA GOODE

Uut and Uup Add Their Atomic Mass to Periodic Table
The New York Times, Feb. 1, 2004, By JAMES GLANZ

Labs rush to cultivate bird flu vaccine, San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 29, 2004, By SABIN RUSSELL
Walk? Chew Gum? Warble?
The New York Times, Jan. 27, 2004, By HENRY FOUNTAIN (Nature Editorial & Article)

Modern humans not descended from Neanderthals
SFGate.com, Jan. 26, 2004, By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID

Dr. Norman Heatley, 92, Dies; Pioneer in Penicillin Supply
The New York Times, Jan. 17, 2004, By ANAHAD O'CONNOR

Hydrogen's Hurdles
The New York Times, Jan. 6, 2004, By HENRY FOUNTAIN, (PNAS Article)

Jumble of Tests May Slow Mad Cow Solution
The New York Times, Jan. 4, 2004, By SANDRA BLAKESLEE

Soot Is Cited as Big Factor in Global Warming
The Associated Press, Dec. 25, 2003. (PNAS Article)

The Insidious March of Prion Diseases
Chem. Eng. News 2003, 45, 50-51.


©2004 Dr. Rainer Glaser's group