COURSES TAUGHT

(A) Lectures & Laboratory Courses | (B) Research Courses
(C) Course Materials | (D) Other Instruction Activities



A. Lectures and Laboratory Courses

Typically, I taught one chemistry course per semester and, in a few fall semesters, I volunteered to teach a third of BIOCHEM 399. I had no teaching duties in WS90 while I taught two courses in WS95. All courses taught since FS96 have made extensive use of computer-assisted communications and various modern teaching technologies. The course web sites employed are hyperlinked to the semester label in which they were taught. Most of these courses involved elements of collaborative learning small learning communities and peer reviews.

CHEMISTRY 133 - Introduction to Synthesis and Analysis (2).
Coordinated laboratory presentation of concepts selected from general, organic, and analytical chemistry. Co-requisites: 33 & 210.
WS95 (180 UGs)
FS95 (178 UGs)
CHEMISTRY 210 - Organic Chemistry (3).
First course of a sequence. Concentrates on fundamentals and applies them to a few functional groups. Only 1 hour credit if student has completed 115. Prerequisites: 11 & 12 or equivalent.
FS91 (200 UGs)
WS92 (150 UGs)
FS92 (170 UGs)
WS97 (180 UGs)
WS99 (202 UGs)
SS99 (50 UGs)
FS00 (240 UGs)
CHEMISTRY 212 - Organic Chemistry (3).
Continuation of 210. Covers carbonyl-containing compounds, amines, heterocycles, natural products (fats, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteines, nucleic acids) and others. Prerequisites: 210 or departmental consent.
FS96 (150 UGs)
CHEMISTRY 212 - Organic Chemistry (5). New Course!
Continuation of 210. Covers carbonyl-containing compounds, amines, heterocycles, natural products (fats, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteines, nucleic acids) and others. Prerequisites: 210 or departmental consent.
WS00 (150 UGs)
CHEMISTRY 211 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2).
Must accompany or follow, cannot precede 210.
WS93 (160 UGs)
BIOCHEMISTRY 399 - Biochem./Biotech. Info. Retrieval (2).
Consists of lectures, library field trips, on-line searching, and data analysis. Information will be retrieved from libraries and on-line data bases using computerized methodology. Areas include chemical structures, patents, and analysis of macromolecules (RNA, DNA, proteins).
WS90 (lim. 5 UG/G)
WS91 (lim. 6 UG/G)
WS92 (lim. 7 UG/G)
WS93 (lim. 12 UG/G)
CHEMISTRY 410 - Organic Seminar (1).
AY91/92
AY95/96
AY96/97
CHEMISTRY 412 - Physical Organic Chemistry I (3).
Bond theory, physical methods, absorption spectroscopy, conformational analysis, mechanisms of reactions.
WS94 (5 Gs)
WS95 (4 Gs)
CHEMISTRY 412 - Computational Organic Chemistry (3).
Theory and Application of modern computational techniques (molecular mechanics, ab initio and semi-empirical molecular orbital methods and much more) for predicting the structures, energies, and properties of molecules and molecular systems. Prerequisites: 233 or equivalent.
FS99 (10 Gs)


CHEMISTRY 415 - Organic Reaction Mechanisms (3).
Organic reaction mechanisms are discussed within the framework of structure-activity relationships. Particular attention directed to the chemistry of the reactive intermediates and the application of stereochemical and molecular orbital concepts. Prerequisites: 1 year of Organic Chemistry and Physical Chemistry.
FS89 (20 Gs)
FS90 (18 Gs)
FS94 (25 Gs)
CHEMISTRY 416 - Organic Spectroscopy (3).
Structural analysis of organic compounds, involving problem solving and using modern NMR, IR, UV/Vis, CD/ORD, MS and other spectroscopic techniques. Prerequisites: 233 or instructor's consent.
FS93 (16 Gs)
WS96 (13 Gs)
FS97 (15 Gs)
CHEMISTRY 419 - Physical Organic Chemistry (3).
Case studies and methods for determining organic reaction mechanisms.
WS91 (5 Gs)
CHEMISTRY 433 - Computational Chemistry (3).
Theory and Application of modern computational techniques (molecular mechanics, ab initio and semi-empirical molecular orbital methods and much more) for predicting the structures, energies, and properties of molecules and molecular systems. Prerequisites: 233 or equivalent.
WS98 (10 Gs)


B. Research Courses

CHEMISTRY 150. Undergraduate Research.
CHEMISTRY 250. Senior Research.
CHEMISTRY 280. Internship in Chemistry.
CHEMISTRY 298. Senior Honors Research.
CHEMISTRY 299. Senior Honors Research.
CHEMISTRY 490. Research (cr. arr.).



C. Preparation of Course Materials

For CHEMISTRY 210, CHEMISTRY 416, and CHEMISTRY 419, I wrote comprehensive and well illustrated lecture notes which were distributed through a local copy service.

A significant part of CHEMISTRY 210 deals with stereochemistry and the use of molecular models and molecular modeling software (Chem3D, Alchemy, ChemDraw) was encouraged. Because of the availability of personal computers on campus, a change in the way we are teaching stereochemistry is already emerging. It is hoped that all students will soon benefit from molecular modeling on personal computers as part of their Organic Chemistry experience.

I emphasized computational chemistry in CHEMISTRY 412, 415, and 419 facilitating hands-on experience in using quantum-mechanical software as well as several self-written programs (VIBRATE, HMO, KIN) first on Vaxstations and later on Silicon Graphics Indigo workstations. In CHEMISTRY 412, the students were intoduced to Hückel theory, semi-empirical and ab initio theory. For the spectroscopy course CHEMISTRY 416, the program VIBRATE was used with great success, and KIN was used to simulate kinetics in CHEMISTRY 415.

VIBRATE - Visualization of Molecular Vibrations (for SGI)
HMO - Hückel Molecular Orbital Program (for Vax and SGI)
KIN - Kinetics Simulation Program, Numerical Evaluation of Differential Equations.
BIOCHEMISTRY 399 was started by Profs. Franz and Quinn (biochemistry), Prof. Forrester (microbiology) and myself. BIOCHEMISTRY 399 consists of lectures, library field trips, on-line searching, and data analysis using computerized methodology. Areas include chemical structures, patents, and analysis of macromolecules (RNA, DNA, proteins). In my section of the course, modern methods for the study of biopolymers are discussed. The students are introduced to molecular mechanics, semi-empirical methods, and ab initio theory. These methods are applied in a computer laboratory using the programs SYBYL, MOPAC, AMPAC, and GAUSSIAN. In 1993, the NSF funded the purchase of four Silicon Graphics Indigo workstations in connection with the development of this course.



D. Other Graduate Student Instruction Activities

Group Meetings

The group meetings (usually 2 hours per week) include discussions of current literature, of methodology, the development of problem solving techniques, and the presentation and defense of original research.

Research Planning and Review Meetings.

Meetings were held (1-2 hours per week) to present the latest research results to the group. Problems are presented, discussed, and attempts are made to solve these problems in team-work.

Seminar and Cumulatives

Gave lectures on my research at least once a year in the Organic Chemistry Seminar, CHEMISTRY 410. On average, I wrote two cumulative examinations and co-authored another per academic year.